How to Get More Love in Your Life

How to Get More Love in Your LifeWe all want more love.

Not even getting the perfect relationship can guarantee you’ll have enough. Couples who’ve been together for years don’t always feel loved the way they’d hoped.

Getting more love in your life doesn’t start with changing your man, or even getting a man.

It starts with changing how you think about love.

Dr. Barbara De Angelis asks a provocative question in her latest book, The Choice for Love.

“What if we could be in love all the time?” she wonders.

What if love isn’t something you get … but rather something you are?

I’ve often been intrigued by the disconnect between how loved someone feels and the quality of their relationship.

I’ve met women who feel absolutely adored, despite the curt or even rude way they’re treated by their men.

I’ve also met women who feel emotionally abandoned, despite having a husband who cares deeply and tries his best.

Dr. De Angelis has an intriguing explanation for this.

She suggests that inside each of us is an ocean of love.

Sometimes this ocean rises up like a great wave, overwhelming us with joy. Sometimes the waters recede, leaving us feeling empty and alone.

The ebb and flow of our own emotions are what makes us feel loved sometimes and not at other times.

From this perspective, no one can give you love—or take it away. The love you feel is always your own.

This is such an empowering metaphor. It helps us visualize the truth that love is an inside job.

How to Get More Love in Your LifeIf you decide that you’re going to fall in love with your life, just as it is, then no one can stop you. So what if one particular man doesn’t return your affections? You still have an entire ocean of love inside you.

Your quest shifts from finding a relationship that will give you the love you don’t have … to finding out what causes that mysterious surge of love inside your heart.

So try this. Get curious about why you feel love at certain times and not others. Can you remember the last few times you felt that rush of love? What was happening? Who were you with? What were you thinking about?

To help you on your quest, here are 3 love triggers. They pave the way for an overwhelming sense of love in your heart—with or without a man.

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How to Deal with His (Insane) Expectations

dealing with men's expectationsThink about the last time you experienced really bad service at a restaurant.

Maybe it took forever to get a table. Or the food was cold when it arrived. Or your order was wrong.

Whatever the case, THE THING that made the experience negative was an unmet expectation.

Expectations are powerful. And the feeling of disappointment that comes with unmet expectations HURTS.

Literally.

When you feel disappointed, your dopamine levels drop like a rock. Neurologically, dopamine plays a big role in feeling good. If dopamine levels dip, that’s when emotional pain kicks in.

The implications for your relationships are huge.

Trust can’t survive in an environment of constant disappointment. Neither can intimacy. If either of you feels let down all the time, that’s not a good sign.

Good-bye happily ever after. Hello broken heart. You don’t want that.

But what about his crazy, unrealistic expectations? He’s a guy, after all. Some guys go into romance with pretty off-the-wall ideas about the way dating should play out.

Let’s take a quick look at three common male assumptions about women, and what you can do to deal with his (possibly insane) expectations.

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How Do You Know If He’s Bad for You?

how to know if you're in a bad relationshipEvery group of friends has one:

The girl who doesn’t see the warning signs about the guy she’s with.

She’s so happy to be with him that you can’t say anything. You exchange concerned glances with other friends, but you know the rules. It’s not your place to comment.

Besides, maybe you don’t know him as well as she does. There must be something good about him.

But still…

You’re just waiting for the fall. For the day she calls you up and tells you she needs you to come over right away, because something REALLY bad has happened. You’re going to be there for her when that day comes. And then you’re finally going to tell her the truth about what you knew all along.

What you never expected was this phone call…

“Guess what?!” Her voice is the most excited you’ve ever heard. “We’re getting married!”

Whether a relationship is healthy or not doesn’t matter to someone in love.

When you love someone, all you know is that you want to be with him. You want to make it work no matter what. If things get hard, you work harder. Obstacles only strengthen your resolve.

It’s not my job to tell people whether they should split up or stay together. What I think of someone’s relationship isn’t as important as what they think of their relationship. But I do see unhealthy relationships. It’s hard not to notice sometimes.

Here are 3 tipoffs that can help you recognize a relationship that’s not good for you.

  1. You may be in a bad relationship if…
    Your self-esteem has been going up and down a lot.

Some relationships lift us up. They make us feel stronger, happier, and better able to take on the world.

Other relationships lift us up only to dash us down. They’re a roller coaster of emotion.

Rocky relationships can consume your life. You hang in there, because the good times are SO good. You keep hoping you’ll find a way to make it work, so you can live happily ever after.

There’s a lot of satisfaction in fighting to keep the relationship together and make him happy. The harder you work on your relationship, the more committed you feel. You can’t give up now. Not after how much effort you’ve put in.

But if the thought of splitting up fills you with terror, you might want to ask whether it’s love or fear keeping you in the relationship.

  1. You may be in a bad relationship if…
    You’ve started doubting yourself more since you’ve been with him.

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The Secret to Lasting Happiness

The Secret to Lasting HappinessI had the good fortune of meeting a lovely elderly woman who was celebrating her 50th wedding anniversary. Of course I had to ask:

“What’s the secret to staying happily married as long as you two?”

“Secret?” She laughed. “There’s no secret. A happy marriage is made up of two happy people. We’re just happy people, I guess.”

From the sparkle in her eyes and the laugh lines etched into her skin, I could see the truth of her statement.

As I excused myself to let the lineup of well-wishers behind me have their turn, I smiled to myself at what she’d said. Just be happy. How easy it sounded!

But then the face of a client I’d spoken to earlier in the week flashed before me.

This woman’s face was young and smooth, but her eyes were red from crying. She was desperate to know how to create happiness in her relationship.

“I don’t know what to do to make him happy. I’ve tried and I’ve tried. It would be so different if he made an effort, too. If he tried to make me happy, just a little bit. But I do everything, and he does nothing.”

She believed what most people believe:

That the point of relationships is to make each other happy.

But is it?

What if we’ve got it all wrong?

Research shows the boost in happiness provided by falling in love and getting married doesn’t last. About two years after the wedding, the couple adapts to their new circumstances. They go back to feeling just about as happy as they used to feel.

We’ve all got a baseline level of happiness. That friend of yours who’s always happy will probably wear that smile until the end of her life, even should some misfortune befall her. That friend of yours who’s never happy will probably always be a bit of a grump, even if she wins the lottery.

You can’t shift your baseline level of happiness by winning a fortune or marrying your dream man. It’s a function of your outlook, not your external circumstances.

Or, as I explain it:

Happiness isn’t what you have. Happiness is how you see the world.

So, when a client comes to my office expecting her partner to make her happy—or expecting to be able to make him happy—I have my doubts.

I explain that there’s a better goal than making your partner happy. In fact, if you pursue this goal, you’ll have a happier relationship than if you spent all your time trying to make your partner happy.

Want to know what it is?

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