How Personal Branding Can Help You Find Your Match

How To Find Your MatchYou’re at a party. Your host introduces you to someone you haven’t met before. He’s tall and good-looking, and his entire attention is focused on you.

He grins and says, “So, tell me about yourself.”

You stare at him like a deer caught in the headlights. He wants me to tell him about MYSELF? What do I say?

He’s still waiting. You’ve got a split second to come up with something.

What should you say?

  1. Ask, “Well, what do you want to know about me?”
  2. Tell him what you do for a living?
  3. Tell him what you do for fun?
  4. Just make sure you slip in the fact that you’re single?

We know first impressions matter. We know that it takes mere seconds for someone to decide if this is a relationship worth pursuing. Any veteran of speed dating can attest to the fact that it’s hard to rock those first few minutes.

Most advice on first impressions focuses on non-verbal body language.

  • Stand up straight
  • Make eye contact
  • Relax and smile

But what about the talking part? If you fumble while thinking of something to say, will he look past that?

Maybe. But why take the chance when you can ensure this never happens to you?

Here’s my simple solution. Have a one or two-sentence personal brand statement prepared in your mind. It sums up who you are and why he might like to get to know you better.

Your personal brand is what makes you unique. In business, it helps distinguish you from your competitors and lets clients and potential employers know why you’re the best fit.

Personal brands are important, too. Especially when you’re dating.

An online dating profile crafted with your personal brand in mind stands out. It catches the right attention from the right people. It even suggests potential conversational topics.

A good personal brand should evoke surprise and delight. There’s something about you he wasn’t expecting. He’s intrigued—in a good way—and he wants to know more.

For many of us, it’s not easy to showcase who we are. We’d rather speak plainly about who we are and try to be as humble as possible. Treating ourselves as a “brand” feels inauthentic—and more than a little vain.

But do you really want a man to see you as ordinary and nothing special?

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